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whether he should face mandatory indictm t indictment. an issue involving the relocation of the u.s. marine corps futenma air station in okinawa also had a negative impact on the hatoyama government. the former prime minister vowed to transfer the american base outside okinawa during last year's election campaign. but last may he reversed his position. hatoyama had essentially sided with japan's biggest ally, the united states. the two countries agreed to relocate part of futenma to u.s. camp schwab, also in okinawa. the agreement prompted the social democrats to quit the democratic party's coalition government. by this time the approval rating for hatoyama's cabinet had fallen to 21%. some democratic party members became nervous because japan's upper house election was just around the corner. hatoyama stepped down together with ozawa to help the dpj regain the public's trust. with hatoyama gone, naoto kan took over, become's japan's fifth leader in just four years. but he's the first one that doesn't come from a political family. kan tried to distance himself from ozawa to show the
using a metal that's not rare earth. japanese researchers have developed the new polishing technology and it's drawing a lot of attention at a time when china is restricting export of rare earth metals. a research group led by ritsumeikan university professor yasuhiro tani has discovered that a metal called zirconium can be used to polish precision glass products. these include televisions with liquid crystal displays and lenses. zirconium can be sourced more easily than cerium, which is the rare earth metal that's now being used for polishing. the researchers also found that the new technology with zirconium will make polishing more efficient rather than with cerium. this will cut metal usage by 40%. the research team plans to put the technology into practical use in about two years. >>> the u.s. is criticizing china and japan over their currency policies. treasury secretary timothy geithner said china is too slow in letting the yuan go higher while lawmakers oppose japan's currency intervention. the senate and the house of representatives invited geithner to the hearings on china's
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